Twitter Chats

Join your AALHE colleagues as we discuss and debate important, controversial, and potentially provocative topics. Each Twitter Chat has at least one facilitator who stimulates discussion and sometimes plays the devil’s advocate. In these topical chats, members and others discuss difficult issues in 140 characters or less. Lurk or fully participate in these fascinating discussions!

Are you new to Twitter? To participate, you need a Twitter account. Use the hashtag #aalhechat to see what others are saying and to contribute your own thoughts. You can find out more about how to participate at http://support.twitter.com/articles/215585-getting-started-with-twitter# or search for “Getting Started with Twitter.”

Upcoming Twitter Chats

Topic: Redefining the New Assessment Norm

Join us for our next Twitter chat scheduled for Tuesday, August 11th to explore the impacts of COVID-19 within higher education from Spring 2020 to the start of the Fall 2020 semester. This Twitter chat will be facilitated by Mindy James from California State University - Long Beach.    

Questions that will be discussed during the August Twitter chat:
  1. How did instruction on your campus shift last semester? What is your institutions plan for Fall 2020?
  2. Where there any unexpected consequences of the abrupt shift in instruction in Fall 2020?
  3. How did assessment change during Covid-19 and how can you take what you learned in Spring 2020 and bring it into Fall 2020?
  4. What is a creative assessment process that you have done or seen (ie. Student-Created Exam, Video Assessment, etc.) and how did the process go?
  5. "When you validate someone’s learning, you validate them as a person," Has your campus started a conversation on equitable assessment? Did the conversation lead to any changes on your campus?
  6. How has Covid-19, or has Covid-19, highlighted inequity at your institution, or in learning assessment in general?
  7. "We end up focusing on the worst possible negative outcomes that the most malicious and malintended student would engage in, rather than starting with, 'What’s the best teaching and learning experience I can construct and deliver for the vast majority of students who are there to learn authentically and who want to succeed?'" Harrison said.
  8. With the shift to more online learning there has been a focus on stopping students from cheating. How can assessment professionals shift that focus to helping faculty build a better teaching and learning experience?